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Wednesday, August 10, 2022

Hidalgo Traditions in North Carolina

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Alicia De Dios Fernandez
Alicia De Dios Fernandez
Inmigrante Mexicana. Originaria del estado de Hidalgo, Organizadora, comunitaria, Activista de derechos humanos. Le gusta colaborar en actividades y causas comunitarias . Escribir es parte de ella . Escribe poemas, pensamientos , artículos , ensayos como parte de auto aprendizaje

Undoubtedly, Mexico has a great wealth and cultural diversity. Each State, each region, has its customs and traditions, its gastronomy and its clothing that distinguishes them and makes them unique.

There are deeply rooted traditions in the inhabitants of the towns, so when they emigrate to other places, they spread these traditions along with them, helping to preserve and spread them.

An example of these traditions is the carnival of the community of Bopo, municipality of Tenango Doria in the state of Hidalgo, which has been celebrated every year since 2014 in Zebulon, North Carolina. This begins on Ash Wednesday, bringing together thousands of people from various states of the American Union such as Chicago, Virginia, Florida, Tennessee, New York, Texas, Kentucky, Mississippi among others, who travel with the emotional purpose of being participants in this beautiful cultural tradition of the Sierra de Hidalgo that belongs to the Huasteca of the region (Otomí – Tepehua and Nahuatl), who, unable to attend the celebration in their place of origin, decide to bring in this way the image of Christ – Lord of Chalma and perform this tradition in Zebulon NC.

The party in honor of the Lord of Chalma with altars full of flowers, processions and the traditional clean.

Among the music of the representative wind bands of the region, Huastec trios and the colors of the carnival costumes and outfits that dance to the rhythm of the sones, turning all this into a joyful cultural festival.

Each costume used in this celebration has its name and its meaning.

To name a few :

The Comanche – Man dressed as an Apache.

El costaludo – Costume made of jute sacks and plastic.

Xitas – The huehue or old man.

The clowns dressed as charro.

All of these come together to dance to the rhythm of the sounds of the Huastec bands and trios with unique voices that express their joy.

The organizers and volunteers, also called butlers, work hard to receive all attendees with great hospitality, preparing traditional food from the region (tamales, barbecue, stews, local bread, coffee and drinks). All this makes attendees enjoy and feel welcomed by this great Hidalguense family.

Each one of them contributes from 1 dollars to 1500 dollars so that this celebration takes place totally free for the general public that attends.

It is in this way that the realization of this beautiful tradition of our peoples of Mexico abroad is achieved, which helps us to preserve and spread it.

 

 

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