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Sunday, October 2, 2022

Avoid job scams this holiday season

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Luis Feliz
Luis Feliz
Organización internacional sin fines de lucro, que promueve la confianza en el mercado y que durante más de 100 años ha buscado mejorar las relaciones entre consumidores y compañías. El BBB del este de Carolina del Norte sirve a 33 condados en el área y cada año más de 2 millones de consumidores obtienen servicios e información completamente gratis. Encuentre: Reporte de negocios, Referencias y consejos, Procesos de reclamos, Verificación de anuncios, Reporte de anuncios, Reporte de entidades benéficas, Avisos de estafas, Estándares de confianza. Si Usted requiere consultar sobre una empresa, producto, servicio o desea hacer un reclamo, comuníquese con el BBB. ¡Le atenderemos en español¡

Photo by Laura Tancredi from Pexels

RALEIGH, NC (November 18, 2021) – Retailers and shippers traditionally hire seasonal workers to meet the demands of holiday shoppers, whether they’re online or in person. These jobs are a great way to earn extra money, sometimes with the possibility of turning into a long-term employment opportunity, however, they are not all that they seem. When looking for something part time or to fill the gap until a better opportunity presents itself, the Better Business Bureau serving eastern NC has some suggestions for a successful seasonal job search. Being proactive in finding the right opportunity is key, but it’s also important to be careful when a job seems too good to be true.

Employers will never ask for an advance payment for a job. Be wary of companies that ask applicants to pay for work supplies, application, or training fees. These expenses are the responsibility of the employer … and a big red flag that something is wrong.

Be wary of job postings that don’t require an interview. Even during peak hiring season, reputable companies prefer to speak to the best candidates before hiring them. If a job offer is submitted without an interview (by phone or in person) or offered only over the Internet, question the company’s hiring practices and do some more research.

Be careful with big money for small jobs. If an employer promises outrageously good wages for what seem like simple tasks like mailing packages, stuffing envelopes, or answering phones, this is a red flag. These too good to be true offers are an attempt to steal your personal information from a bogus job application and can cause problems for a long time.

Never work for a company before you are hired. A legitimate company will not ask potential applicants to complete complex projects before making an official offer. Before starting any job, ask for an offer letter or written confirmation of what the job entails, including an official start date and compensation details.

For more tips on how to avoid this scam contact Luis Feliz at 919-277-4228 or lfeliz@raleigh.bbb.org

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